• Charleston Street Flooding, Mapped

    Crowd sourcing data can produce wonderfully useful results. In this case, a crowd-sourced map of flood-prone streets in notoriously flood-prone Charleston. We’re entering the rainy season in August, so use scrupulously.

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  • Huger Streetscaping

    Huger Street Streetscaping Arial View

    Marking the boundary between historic Charleston and the Upper Peninsula district, Huger Street has served as a secondary roadway connecting Morrison Drive, Meeting Street, King Street, and into the Hampton Park Terrace neighborhood. However, the importance and prominence of Huger Street in Charleston’s infrastructure has never been more important. Traffic on the street began to increase with the opening of the Ravenel Bridge in 2005. With the King Street business district continuing to grow into the North Central borough, the

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  • Designing the Upper Peninsula

    Charleston’s intentions for The Upper Peninsula Initiative are to direct population growth towards the city center in an effort to mitigate sprawl. Of the eight strategies implemented in the EcoDistricts framework, Urban Form & Pattern has the most apparent and enduring influence. The arrangement of building densities, their heights and architectural styles, as well as the natural environment and transportation infrastructures are all paramount in the planning for Charleston’s Upper Peninsula. This urban structure is fluid, changing over time in

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  • A Livable Upper Peninsula

    Venture north along the east side of the Charleston upper peninsula, and you will see the charm and history of the port city taper into an disjointed patchwork of abandoned industrial sites, public housing, and a sprinkling of trendy restaurants. The area is the obvious next frontier for growth in Charleston, and City Hall wants to make sure development occurs in a thoughtful way. Enter the Upper Peninsula Initiative. An Outlet for Growth When you speak with Charleston’s chief city

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  • Lowcountry Lowline to Reconnect Neighborhoods

    Many scars remain in Charleston from transportation works projects of decades past, from a time when all civic projects were laser focused on an automobile-centric vision for a city’s future. In the 1960s, our fair port city was connected with America’s burgeoning interstate highway system with the Interstate 26 project. Paving a beeline freeway from the upstate, zipping through the capital city of Columbia and sailing across the Interstate 95 interchange, the most difficult portion of its construction

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  • Clean Trucks in Charleston

    Good news for anyone who breathes air in our fair city – the Port of Charleston is expanding its efforts to see that the trucks moving cargo in and out of its terminals are newer and cleaner with fewer emissions. The air quality in Charleston, particularly in the areas around the ports and interstates, is an inherent victim of the booming commerce provided by the ports. The S.C. State Ports Authority (SPA), the state agency

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