• Charleston Recycles

    In celebration of America Recycles Day, Charleston County Environmental Management has announced Community Collection Day on Saturday, November 16. Located this year at James Island Elementary School from 9:00am-1:00pm, the event serves to offer Charleston County residents a central location to drop off their discarded items that are not collected via the County’s residential curbside recycling program. highlight the benefits of reuse and to remind residents of other options for disposal. This event not only

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  • Lowcountry Lowline to Reconnect Neighborhoods

    Many scars remain in Charleston from transportation works projects of decades past, from a time when all civic projects were laser focused on an automobile-centric vision for a city’s future. In the 1960s, our fair port city was connected with America’s burgeoning interstate highway system with the Interstate 26 project. Paving a beeline freeway from the upstate, zipping through the capital city of Columbia and sailing across the Interstate 95 interchange, the most difficult portion of its construction

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  • Clean Trucks in Charleston

    Good news for anyone who breathes air in our fair city – the Port of Charleston is expanding its efforts to see that the trucks moving cargo in and out of its terminals are newer and cleaner with fewer emissions. The air quality in Charleston, particularly in the areas around the ports and interstates, is an inherent victim of the booming commerce provided by the ports. The S.C. State Ports Authority (SPA), the state agency

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  • The Beaux-Arts Architecture of King Street

    Photo by Jonathan Boncek

    The Beaux Arts style is a product of French neoclassical architecture that made its way into American design in the late 19th century. Characterized by masonry walls, façades of quoins, pilasters, or columns, and wall surfaces decorated with garlands, flowers, or shields, the term “Beaux Arts” derives from the École des Beaux-Arts in France. Many American architects studied in the late 19th century and brought home ideas based on classical precedents inspired by their experience in France.

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